British gardeners plant the seeds for a bright future

GARDENING REVIEW FOR THE WEEK OF 15 NOV 2013

The growing season may be over, but that hasn’t stopped British gardeners from being recognised for their contributions to keeping the UK green and beautiful.

First up this week, the best gardeners from Newquay had their contributions celebrated at an awards ceremony designed to commemorate the area’s gold success in the 2013 Britain and South West in Bloom competitions. Many of the town’s gardeners that were recognised included younger Brits that got themselves involved in gardening for the first time. Stories like this absolutely tickle me to no end – it’s a good standard to set for the south west. Hopefully gardeners in Bristol can use Newquay’s success as inspiration to redouble their efforts next year!

Speaking of the coming year, there are a cadre of talented gardeners across the country that are being included in the Nation of Gardeners campaign, an effort to create the first-ever growing map of the UK. The sixteen gardeners will be sent all sorts of seeds, bulbs and plants in order for them to record their growing efforts. The end goal is to create a detailed map of what kinds of plants are grown in the country and what time of year their growing cycles are the most successful.

The map is especially important due to the volatile weather conditions of the British mainland, experts say. Doubtless it will be of a fantastic help to garden centres and gardeners across the UK as they can now plan their own planting with confidence based on their location and the results of the growing map’s data.

The first parcel has already gone out, containing garlic, sweet peas and broad beans. All the gardeners were instructed to being their planting within a very specific time window in order to make it easy for the data to be gathered.

This is an absolutely brilliant idea and I’m so glad it’s being undertaken. Gardeners are going to absolutely love the support this growing map will bring, and it will make it much easier to plan ahead to grow all sorts of plants; the project will not just record information on growing fruit and veg but anything and everything you could ever think should be included in a proper British garden.

For what it’s worth, I wish the new growing map project nothing but the best. If there were more projects like this in the future, I’m sure that the coming spring and autumn growing seasons for next year are going to be brilliant.